Blogging the Afternoon Away

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I’ve read a lot of blogs as a new mom.  Blogs about baby registry essentials, how to help your newborn distinguish day from night, and how to survive on little sleep.  I was excited to have a list of technology blogs at my finger tips.  My husband calls me an Apple-poser.  I have an iPhone, an iPad, and a MacBook but I underutilize them all so much.  I get the point behind having a user guide online but really, having it in the box makes it so much more accessible.  Maybe this list of blogs will help me embrace my inner techie.

I read a few blogs from, “Flipped Learning – Turning Learning on Its Head.”  Flipped learning, like most things in this class, is a new concept to me that I am really curious about.  Asking students to watch a video about content to provide more class time for exploration and applying the concepts seems like a no brainer to me. 

I met a few teachers during my field experience who have mentioned feeling burnt out with teaching the same lessons year after year.  Flipped learning would be a great way to rid the monotony that they are feeling (yes, I acknowledge that there are several other ways).  But I can’t help but think about the students who don’t have computers at home.  How is this issue going to be addressed?

[SIDE NOTE: In Maine (I know, we’re in VA but ME is my heart and soul), all seventh and eighth graders are given laptops.  They are assigned the laptops at the beginning of seventh grade and keep them until the last day of school in eighth grade.  It seems that Henrico County is the only county in Virginia that offers a similar program.  Henrico Co. gives sixth through twelfth graders laptops.  Test scores improved, learning is more engaging, but most importantly, it evens the educational playing field.  It creates learning equity.  And this is also a benefit to the student’s parents or siblings – if they are willing to share.]

It seems like it is a daunting task to make flipped learning videos.  I would imagine that they can’t be any old video; rather, they must excite and engage students.  Jon Bergmann (the blogger) has several questions that he highlights for teachers to consider before they dive in head first.  It would also be beneficial for teachers to use other flipped learning videos that educators have shared.  Bergmann has several science videos on his YouTube channel and it seems that they are fairly accessible. 

I’m excited about flipped classrooms and I look forward to being able to try it myself as a student first.  Hopefully I will be able to put all distractions aside (namely my adorable son) and allow myself to be fully engaged.

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